ASSEMBLY GUIDES

Bike Assembly Guide

Congratulations on your new bike! For us, there’s nothing more exciting than building your bike. In this article, we will show you how to assemble your brand new machine. Don’t worry, it won’t be super challenging, as we have already done most of the work for you.

Also, make sure to check out some hot tips from freeride legend Matt Jones on his last visit to the Bikes Online Headquarters:

Feel free to scroll through the following assembly guides for each specific component. We've added links to the in-depth articles, where you'll also find detailed videos covering each of the processes. Alternatively, you may also check out our YouTube channel "How to Video Guides" playlist for all related content.

REMOVING THE BIKE FROM THE BOX

Place your bike box in a nice, open area to make assembly easy. For more detailed information, you can also check out our Unboxing Guide.

Open the top of the box and remove the small parts box. This contains everything you will need to build your bike.

  1. On top, you will see a torque wrench to ensure you don’t over tighten any bolts when assembling your bike, and a pedal spanner. 

  2. Underneath you will find manuals, a bell, rubber frame protectors, quick release axle, reflectors, any tools or parts associated with the bike and components, and some bikes will even include a spare derailleur hanger, Make sure you keep all of these parts as you will need them for the assembly and in the future.

  3. Carefully lift the bike out of the box and place it on the floor; alternatively, you can hook the front fork over the edge of the box. This makes for a simple work stand to free up both hands.

  4. Then remove all the packaging and place it all to one side, Make sure you keep it all in case you ever need to transport your bike or return it.


INSTALLING THE HANDLEBARS

Next, you need to attach your handlebars to the bike.  You may also see our Handlebars Installation Guide for more detailed information.

 

Start by removing the faceplate of the stem; this will require a 4 or 5mm hex key, depending on the model.

  1. To ensure the cables aren’t twisted, place the center of the handlebar on the stem. Reattach the faceplate and tighten the bolts to 5nm, using an alternating diagonal pattern to make sure even tension is applied. 

  2. You can check this by looking at the gap between the stem and the faceplate from above and below the stem.


INSTALLING THE SEATPOST

As part of our pro-build, the inside of the seat tube should already be greased. If you have a dropper post, you may also check out our Dropper Post Installation Guide.

If you have a regular seat post, simply insert the seat post in the seat tube, ensuring the minimum insertion depth is below the top of the seat tube.

  1. Then tighten the seat post clamp to 6nm. If your bike has a quick release, ensure the lever is pointing forward when closed and you get enough pressure on the lever to feel resistance around half way, which should leave a mark on your palm.

  2. If your bike has a dropper post, all you need to do is insert the cable end with the clamp into the actuator, making sure the cable end sits nicely in the slot.

  3. Once inserted, pull the cable through at the headtube or at the bottom of the seat tube, depending on the bike, as you insert the seat post into the seat tube.

  4. Then tighten the seat clamp using your provided torque wrench to the recommended torque on the seat post clamp.


INSTALLING THE PEDALS

Next, you need to install the pedals. Like the seat post, the threads in the crank should already be greased. For more details, please see our Pedals installation Guide.

The pedals are labelled left and right, either with a sticker or etched on the axle.

  1. The threads on the bolts are different but always remember that both pedals always tighten, turning towards the front of the bike.

  2. Install the right pedal first by hand, screwing it clockwise, then use the pedal spanner and tighten it firmly.

  3. Then install the left pedal again by hand first, screwing it anti-clockwise, then use the pedal spanner and tighten it firmly.


INSTALLING THE FRONT WHEEL

Lastly, you need to install your front wheel. You can find more information on our Front wheel installation Guide.

Firstly, check the plastic packaging protectors that came on the wheels to see if the hub spacers didn’t get caught on the packaging. If your bike comes with a quick-release skewer, it will be in the small parts box that came with the bike.

  1. Remove the nut and one spring. Then insert the skewer with the quick release lever on the left-hand side of the wheel; this will be the side with the disc brake rotor. Install the spring with the small end first and then screw on the nut two turns later.

  2. Now you can install the wheel on the forks. If the bike uses rim brakes, you will need to turn the quick release cam to open up the brakes. If your bike has disc brakes, remove the plastic spacer and be careful not to squeeze the brakes. Lastly, ensure the brake rotor goes easily into the calliper.

  3. Then tighten the nut, continually checking the tension of the quick-release lever. Once it starts to become firm at roughly 90 degrees, you can close the lever. It should leave an imprint on your palm. It is best to have the lever pointing vertically or facing backward and not contacting any part of the frame.

  4. If your bike has a thru-axle, remove the axles from the fork, then place the front wheel into the fork. Place the axle through the fork. Then hand thread the axle, turning clockwise. The axles will tighten by using an Allen key or a lever. If it tightens using an allen key, tighten it to the recommended torque using the provided torque wrench. If it uses a lever, tighten it, continually checking the tension of the lever. Once it starts to become firm at roughly 90 degrees, you can close the lever. It should leave an imprint on your palm.

  5. Lastly, if your bike has rim brakes, don’t forget to turn the rim brake cam back to the closed position.


FINAL CHECK

Your bike is now finally built, It is always good practice to go over all the bolts on the bike to make sure they are tight. For more comprehensive guides, please refer to our Initial Adjustments and Initial Bike Fit articles.

  1. Check to make sure the rear axle is tight.

  2. After your first ride, check all the bolts, pedals, and axles again, as they may come loose after the first ride.

  3. It is also important to get your bike serviced within the first 3 months through one of our national service networks or your local bike shop, as the gear and brakes may need minor adjustments as part of the break-in period.

  4. If you are having any trouble with any part of the installation, check out our individual videos on each of the bike build steps, and be sure to check out our video on how to set up your bike to fit you before your first ride.


CONCLUSION

Regardless of the specific bike model, the following video will cover all aspects mentioned in this article, so make sure to check it out:

And now you should be able to complete the assembly steps for your new bike.

To help you get your head around servicing and care instructions, in addition to the articles mentioned above, we have put together the following reading list:

 

  1. Periodical Maintenance

  2. Safety Check

  3. Repacking your bike

  4. Storing your bike 

  5. Transporting your bike

  6. Customizing your bike

  7. Service Advice & Costs

  8. Suspension Service Schedule

  9. National Service Network

Feel free to contact us in case you have any questions or concerns and happy riding!

 


Disclaimer of Liability:

Bikes Online endeavours to ensure the quality of the information contained in this Help Center is accurate, but does not guarantee it. Inadequate professional knowledge can lead to serious accidents to oneself and their products. Bikes Online is not liable for any damage or injury resulting from these attempts. This applies particularly to damage resulting from incorrect repairs, adjustments, or services. If in any doubt, you should send your bike to a professional store, mechanic, or qualified specialist. Bikes Online gives no guarantee or accepts liability for any of the information contained in this Help Center.

Handlebars Installation

Assembling your new bike is one of the most exciting tasks ever, we agree. One of the components you’ll need to install upon receiving your new bike is your handlebar, Follow this step-by-step guide and you’ll be steering in no time!

 

The tools needed for this job are: a 4mm hex key and the supplied Entity torque.

HANDLEBAR INSTALLATION

first thing to do is prepare your work area. Detach the Velcro straps that secure the handlebars to the bike, spin the forks so your stem is facing the front of the bike and remove the stem faceplate using the 4mm hex key.

next step is to ensure the cables are correctly routed; they should be all in front of the headtube and forks and show no twists or sharp bends. As a rule of thumb, your front brake cable should be in front of your rear brake cable once you have the bars in place.

With the bars centered on the stem and the cables correctly routed, we can start reinstalling the faceplate. For that, we want to tighten the faceplate bolts evenly in a cross pattern, ensuring correct alignment and force distribution. In other words, we want to lightly tighten the bolts in small increments following this order: top right, bottom left, top left, bottom right.

Once the handlebars are in place, we can then perform adjustments to the bar rotation and control angle in order to achieve the most comfortable riding position. Go ahead and try different options while sitting on the saddle until you find the desired position.

Now that we have found the perfect handlebar position, we can then use our entity torque wrench to tighten the faceplate bolts to 5 Nm. Now that you're at it, it’s good to double check the torque on the stem pinch bolts as well, which should also be 5 Nm.

If your bike comes with a quill-style stem, the process might differ a little. If that's your case, please refer to the video below.

And there you have it: how to properly install the handlebars on your new bike. Feel free to contact us in case you have any questions or concerns and happy riding!

 


Disclaimer of Liability:

Bikes Online24 endeavours to ensure the quality of the information contained in this Help Center is accurate, but does not guarantee it. Inadequate professional knowledge can lead to serious accidents to oneself and their products. Bikes Online24 is not liable for any damage or injury resulting from these attempts. This applies particularly to damage resulting from incorrect repairs, adjustments, or services. If in any doubt, you should send your bike to a professional store, mechanic, or qualified specialist. Bikes Online24 gives no guarantee or accepts liability for any of the information contained in this Help Center.

Front Wheel Installation

This article will guide you through how to install the front wheel on your new bike. Your front wheel can be attached to the bike in different ways; we will cover the most commonly found attachment types in this article.

Before starting the front wheel installation, make sure to spin your forks so the stem is facing forward. Before you install your wheel, check the plastic packaging protectors that came on the wheels to see if the hub spacers didn’t get caught on the packaging.


NUTTED WHEELS

For nutted front wheel installation, you will need the provided 15mm spanner from your small parts box. You will need to release the brakes to provide clearance for the tire to insert fully into the forks. There are two main styles of rim brakes: v-brakes and calliper brakes.

For v-brakes, all you need to do is squeeze the arms together and remove the brake noodle from the housing. For calliper brakes, simply turn the quick release cam to open up the brakes.

Now you can install the wheel into the fork dropouts and evenly tighten the nuts. Make sure to make it tight; the approximate torque spec on these nuts should be somewhere between 8 and 12 Nm.

Lastly, don’t forget to reattach the brakes or turn the quick release cam back to the closed position, and double-check the action of the brakes before you go out on a ride.

QUICK RELEASE

To install your quick-release axle, you will need the provided axle from your small parts box. Again, if your bike comes with rim brakes, you will need to release the brakes to provide clearance for the tire to insert fully into the forks.

For v-brakes, all you need to do is squeeze the arms together and remove the brake noodle from the housing. For calliper brakes, simply turn the quick release cam to open up the brakes.

For disc brakes, all that is required is to remove the plastic spacer from the calliper and be careful not to squeeze the brakes while the wheel’s not installed, as this will close the pistons. However, if this does occur, simply use a clean tire lever or flat-head screwdriver to spread the pads back.

Now, get the quick release from the small parts box and remove the nut and one spring from the axle. Insert the skewer with the quick release lever on the left-hand side of the wheel; this will be the side with the disc brake rotor if your bike comes with disc brakes. Then, reinstall the spring with the small end first and screw on the nut roughly two turns.

Now you can install the wheel into the fork dropouts, ensuring the brake rotor goes easily into the calliper on disc brake bikes. Then tighten the nut, continually checking the tension of the quick-release lever.

Once you feel resistance at roughly half-way, you can close the lever. It should leave an imprint on your palm. Once fully closed, it is best to have the lever pointing up or facing backwards and not contacting any part of the frame.

Lastly, if your bike has rim brakes, don’t forget to reattach the brakes or turn the quick release cam back to the closed position, and double-check the action of the brakes before you go out on a big ride.

THROUGH AXLE

Many of our bikes will come equipped with a front-through axle. Some higher-end suspension forks will also have a 6mm pinch bolt on the drive side dropout, which is there to ensure the axle is properly secured in place when subject to extreme riding conditions. Make sure to check if your fork has that pinch bolt and loosen it prior to the wheel installation. 

After loosening the pinch bolt on the forks’ drive side dropout and unscrewing the through axle, install the wheel into the forks, taking special care with the rotor alignment; it should fit easily into the brake calliper.

Slide the axle through the dropouts and hub and torque it to 9–11 Nm; check the manufacturer's specifications for your particular model. At this point, it is recommended to compress the forks a couple of times to ensure the lower leg has settled into its low-friction point, then (in case your fork has the pinch bolt) tighten the pinch bolt to 5 Nm. 

SUNTOUR Q-LOC AXLE

Some of our Suntour fork-equipped bikes will come with a particular through axle called "Q-LOC,"  and it’s installation differs from other standard axles.

To remove the “Suntour Q-LOC,” first open the lever located on the drive side, then push and turn the non-drive side knob clockwise. This will free the axle from the forks.

Install the wheel into the forks, taking special care with the rotor alignment. With the axle lever open, push and turn the non-drive side knob anti-clockwise. Slide the “Q-LOC” axle through the dropouts and hub until we see the red expanding plug coming out of the dropouts.

We can now adjust tension if necessary by turning the non-drive side knob so we feel resistance about half way when closing the quick-release mechanism.

With the information provided in this article, you should now be able to install your front wheel with ease. Feel free to contact us in case you have any questions or concerns and happy riding!

 


Disclaimer of Liability:

Bikes Online24 endeavours to ensure the quality of the information contained in this Help Center is accurate, but does not guarantee it. Inadequate professional knowledge can lead to serious accidents to oneself and their products. BikesOnline24 is not liable for any damage or injury resulting from these attempts. This applies particularly to damage resulting from incorrect repairs, adjustments, or services. If in any doubt, you should send your bike to a professional store, mechanic, or qualified specialist. Bikes Online24 gives no guarantee or accepts liability for any of the information contained in this Help Center.

Pedals Installation

Assembling your new bike is one of the most exciting tasks ever, we agree. One of the components you’ll need to install upon receiving your new bike are your pedals, Follow this step-by-step guide and you’ll be pedalling in no time!

The tool needed for this job is the supplied 15-mm pedal spanner.

PEDALS INSTALLATION

Installing the pedals may seem like an easy job, but there are some things you should keep in mind to avoid any grief.

The most important thing to note is that while your right pedal has a standard thread, your left pedal comes with a reverse thread. What this means is that, differently from the right pedal, you’ll need to screw the left pedal counter-clockwise in order to tighten it.

We recommend preparing the pedal threads with a dab of grease and starting the thread by hand. This will avoid damage to the pedal and crank arm threads and make it easier to remove the pedals when the time comes to replace, clean or service them.

Once we’ve threaded most of the way in by hand, we can then use the 15mm pedal spanner to torque them, making sure it’s quite tight.

And there you have it: how to properly install the pedals on your new bike. Feel free to contact us in case you have any questions or concerns and happy riding!

 


Disclaimer of Liability:

Bikes Online24 endeavours to ensure the quality of the information contained in this Help Center is accurate, but does not guarantee it. Inadequate professional knowledge can lead to serious accidents to oneself and their products. BikesOnline24 is not liable for any damage or injury resulting from these attempts. This applies particularly to damage resulting from incorrect repairs, adjustments, or services. If in any doubt, you should send your bike to a professional store, mechanic, or qualified specialist. Bikes Online24 gives no guarantee or accepts liability for any of the information contained in this Help Center.

Dropper Post Installation

Dropper posts are a game changer for mountain biking, allowing you to have your optimal pedalling position for climbing and with a simple press of the lever, you can push the saddle down to slay the descents. This is why a lot of our bikes now have dropper posts.

Worry not; they aren't too hard to set up, as we have done a lot of the hard work for you. We have already cut the cable to length. So all you need to do is insert the cable end with the clamp into the actuator and ensure the cable end sits nicely in the slot.

DROPPER POST INSTALLATION

Before you insert the seat post, it’s good to put a bit of grease on the seat post or friction paste if the frame is carbon. Once inserted, pull the cable through at the headtube or at the bottom of the seat tube, depending on the bike model, to ensure it doesn't kink and inserts smoothly. It is also important to note that the minimum insert line is inside the seat tube.

Next, check your saddle height with the post fully extended; this will be your climbing position. Then tighten the seat clamp using your provided torque wrench to the recommended torque on the seat post clamp. If the post sticks, it is possible the seat post is tightened too much, so back it off a little.

Lastly, check to see your dropper post works by holding the lever and pressing down the seat at the same time. To return the post to full height, simply press the lever without any pressure on the saddle. 

A few simple tips if you haven't ridden with a dropper post before. It is best to pre-emptively use the post. So just before you start descending or approaching an obstacle, press the lever while pushing the saddle down using your body weight and just before you start climbing again, press the lever with your weight off the saddle to get back into the optimal climbing position.

If you find the dropper post keeps going up after you try to drop it without pressing the lever, it is likely the cable is too tight, so for a trail-side fix, you can turn the barrel adjuster at the lever clockwise to loosen it. If the post isn't returning, the cable is likely too loose, so turn the barrel adjuster anti-clockwise.

So there you go! That’s how you set up your new dropper post on your new bike! Feel free to contact us in case you have any questions or concerns and happy riding!

 


Disclaimer of Liability:

Bikes Online24 endeavours to ensure the quality of the information contained in this Help Center is accurate, but does not guarantee it. Inadequate professional knowledge can lead to serious accidents to oneself and their products. BikesOnline24 is not liable for any damage or injury resulting from these attempts. This applies particularly to damage resulting from incorrect repairs, adjustments, or services. If in any doubt, you should send your bike to a professional store, mechanic, or qualified specialist. Bikes Online24 gives no guarantee or accepts liability for any of the information contained in this Help Center.

 
 
Fox Mudguard Installation

This article will guide you through how to install the mudguard on your Fox 36 and 38 suspension forks.

Please watch the video below for a complete guide on the Fox 36/38 supplied mudguard installation. Don't forget to remove the plastic spacers when reinstalling the mounting bolts!


Disclaimer of Liability:

BikesOnline24 endeavors to ensure the quality of the information contained in this Help Center is accurate. Inadequate professional knowledge can lead to serious accidents for oneself and the product. BikesOnline24.com is not liable for any damage or injury resulting from these attempts. This applies particularly to damage resulting from incorrect repairs, adjustments, or services. If in any doubt, you should send your bike to a professional store, mechanic, or qualified specialist. BikesOnline24 gives no guarantee or accepts liability for any of the information contained in this Help Center.

Unpacking your bike

Exciting times ahead! This article will guide you through what comes with your new bike and how to unpack it.

UNBOXING

When you open your new bike box, you will see a small box on top. This contains everything you will need to build your bike.

Opening the small parts box, you will see a multi-tool or a torque wrench, depending on your bike model and a 15-mm wrench to tighten pedals and nutted axles. Underneath you will find manuals, pedals, reflectors, bells, quick-release axles, rubber cable protections, and any other tools or parts associated with the bike. Make sure you keep all of these parts and tools, as you will need them for the assembly or in the future.

Next, carefully lift the bike out of the box and place it on the floor. It’s a good idea to take a few photos of the bike so you can remember what it looks like and where all the packaging is located.

Then remove all the packaging, starting with the seat post, then the bars, the wheel, the fork, and the derailleur protector, and place it all on one side. Make sure you keep it all in case you ever need to transport your bike or return it.

Ensure you check all the packaging, especially the plastic end caps of the front wheel, as the hub spacers may become stuck to the packaging. At this point, check out the bike; does it have a dropper post or a regular seat post? Does it have a thru-axle, quick-release, or nutted axles?

Now you can check out the appropriate tutorial videos for each aspect of your bike build in our Help Center Assembly Guides section. Feel free to contact us in case you have any questions or concerns and happy riding!

 


Disclaimer of Liability:

Bikes Online24 endeavours to ensure the quality of the information contained in this Help Center is accurate, but does not guarantee it. Inadequate professional knowledge can lead to serious accidents to oneself and their products. BikesOnline24 is not liable for any damage or injury resulting from these attempts. This applies particularly to damage resulting from incorrect repairs, adjustments, or services. If in any doubt, you should send your bike to a professional store, mechanic, or qualified specialist. Bikes Online24 gives no guarantee or accepts liability for any of the information contained in this Help Center.

 
 
Repacking your bike

In case you need to repack your bike for travel or shipping, follow this step-by-step guide to ensure it will reach its destination in great shape, reducing the chances of damage in transit.

Hopefully, you’ve kept all the packaging material you got when receiving your bike. We’ll be using those to repack it. If you happen not to have the original packaging, you may use a different packing material, including some sort of impact absorber for the contact points. You should be able to get a bike box from your local bike shop at no cost.

REBOXING

To safely transport a bike, we want to remove the pedals, handlebars, seat post, and front wheel and firmly attach all of those parts to the frame, caring for the contact points and creating one solid unit inside the box, as opposed to unsecured components that can jiggle around inside the box while being handled and transported.

When removing the pedals, keep in mind that the left pedal has a reverse thread, which means we need to unscrew it clockwise in order to remove it. Remove the handlebars by unscrewing the stem faceplate bolts and carefully hanging the bars by the control cables. After that, you can reattach the faceplate so you don’t lose it. Remove the seat post by loosening the seat post clamp and finally the front wheel.

It is recommended to use all the provided plastic protective materials, such as fork dropout protectors, rear derailleur protectors, and hub protectors. The Styrofoam block is used to protect your front disc rotor and should be installed prior to the plastic hub protector.

With all the components off the bike and properly protected, it is time to protect the frame and secure all the parts to it using the foam blocks and Velcro straps. The foam blocks (or a similar impact absorber material) should be placed between the bike frame and the components, protecting them from scratches or any kind of damage. Be super careful while doing this and make sure to secure the parts tightly with Velcro straps or something similar. If you’re attentive and patient while doing this, you’ll have a solid unit by the end of this process and fewer chances of having the bike damaged in transit.

Now we can slide the bike into the box. Before taping it closed, you have the chance to add any other parts or apparel you need to transport with the bike.

By now, you should have a properly packed bike, ready to be transported! Feel free to contact us in case you have any questions or concerns and happy riding!

 


Disclaimer of Liability:

Bikes Online24 endeavours to ensure the quality of the information contained in this Help Center is accurate, but does not guarantee it. Inadequate professional knowledge can lead to serious accidents to oneself and their products. BikesOnline24.com is not liable for any damage or injury resulting from these attempts. This applies particularly to damage resulting from incorrect repairs, adjustments, or services. If in any doubt, you should send your bike to a professional store, mechanic, or qualified specialist. Bikes Online24 gives no guarantee or accepts liability for any of the information contained in this Help Center.